The Best Foods for Eye Health: Know What Foods Are Good for Your Eyes

Date: 2018-08-20

You know some foods are healthier for you than others, but did you know that your diet can directly impact your vision? You can help protect your eyesight by eating  certain foods. And you don’t have to eat the same thing every day to eat well for your eyes.

Foods high in vitamins A, C & E, beta-carotene, omega-3 fatty acids, zinc, lutein and zeaxanthin, as well as antioxidants are the key to protecting your vision. So, what foods are good for eyesight vision? The experts at Envolve Vision are here to help you plan your next week of meals and help protect your eyes. 

Fish

There are many benefits of eating fish, and better eye health is one of them. Fish contain high levels of omega-3, which are fatty acids that have been proven to protect against cataracts, dry eyes and age-related eye deterioration. For these reasons, you should consider making fish a part of your diet.

There are many fish in the sea, and those with the highest concentrations of omega-3 include tasty and easy-to-find options like tuna, salmon, trout, sardines, herring and mackerel.

Nuts & Legumes

When your stomach starts to growl mid-afternoon, your body is calling out for a nourishing snack that’ll keep you full until dinner—why not make that snack eye healthy too? Nuts and legumes, including almonds, walnuts, cashews, peanuts and lentils, are common salty treats that make for great snacks or easy additions to a meal AND are great for your vision.

Like fish, nuts and legumes are rich in Omega-3s, but they also contain high levels of Vitamin E, an antioxidant reported to ward off cataracts and macular degeneration.

Vitamin E is thought to cut down on free radicals in the body, which may contribute to the breakdown healthy eye tissue. Eating nuts, legumes, and seeds like chia or flax seeds may help your vision and can easily be incorporated in your diet.

Citrus Fruits

Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, can help protect your eyes. Citrus fruits, including lemons, oranges and grapefruits, are rich in Vitamin C, a natural antioxidant that plays an important role in protecting against eye diseases. The American Optometric Association says the Vitamin C may help lower the risk of developing cataracts.

Leafy Greens

Orange juice has gotten a sparkling reputation as a great source for Vitamin C, but there’s another food group that has even more of it: leafy greens, which includes foods like spinach, kale, and collard greens.

Green vegetables contain high levels of lutein and zeaxanthin, which may protect your retinas -- making them an eye health triple threat. To get the biggest benefits from these superfoods, eat them raw. Locally, stop by the Nash County Farmer’s Market and pick up some of these healthy choices.

Carrots 

You may have heard that carrots are linked with improved night eyesight. Carrots are orange because of their high level of beta carotene, which is converted to Vitamin A in the body. Vitamin A is important for cornea health and helps us see in lower light situations. Because of its night vision benefits, carrots are one of the best foods for eye health.

Dairy

Dairy products contain Vitamin A and Zinc, a mineral naturally found throughout the eye. Like beta carotene, zinc has been shown to help with night vision and in warding off cataracts. The combination of vitamin A and zinc is excellent for eyesight because vitamin A aids the cornea while zinc allows the body to pull that vitamin A from the liver to the eye. Yogurt (especially without lots of added sugar) is a great way to get a healthy dose of dairy.

Water 

Have you had any water yet today? Up to 60% of the human body is made of water, and water makes up a large percentage of the human eye. It’s no surprise that keeping our bodies hydrated keeps our eyes hydrated, helping to ward off dry eyes. Water naturally helps combat dehydration, which may be a cause of dry eye symptoms. Drink at least a half-gallon of water every day to stay fully hydrated.

Learn more tips from Dr. Jill Scullion and Envolve Optical in this video: